Towards a Wireless Lexicon

Seminar
Thursday, May 06, 2010
10:00am
ENS 637

Abstract:

Wireless protocol design today is based on a simple model of howwireless channel behaves. This model does not capture the temporal andspatial correlations of packet reception that wireless linksexperience in reality. Unfortunately, moving beyond this model hasbeen difficult due to the lack of good ways to quantify wireless linkcomplexities.

In this talk, I will show how to quantify temporal and spatialcorrelations to aid our understanding of higher-layer protocolperformance. I will discuss why existing correlation metrics fromwidely used analytic models such as the Gillbert-Elliot model areinsufficient. I will demonstrate that our temporal correlation metric,beta, is useful in understanding MAC-layer performance. I will alsoshow how we can use the spatial correlation metric, kappa, to decidewhen to use opportunistic routing and network coding protocols.

This work is a first step towards a wireless lexicon that will provideuseful insights into how well wireless protocols perform in differentenvironments.

Biography:

Kannan Srinivasan is currently a PhD candidate at Stanford University.His research interests are broadly in the area of Wireless Networking.He has worked on several aspects of wireless networks includingmeasurements, simulations, security, networking and transport layerprotocols. He is an author of over 15 publications in peer-reviewedconferences, journals, and the IETF. Before coming to Stanford, he wasa researcher at the National Research Council of Canada.

Speaker

PhD Candidate
Stanford University

Kannan Srinivasan is currently a PhD candidate at Stanford University.His research interests are broadly in the area of Wireless Networking.He has worked on several aspects of wireless networks includingmeasurements, simulations, security, networking and transport layerprotocols. He is an author of over 15 publications in peer-reviewedconferences, journals, and the IETF. Before coming to Stanford, he was a researcher at the National Research Council of Canada.